Friday, January 19, 2018

Mae West: It's Homosexology

MAE WEST left her imprint on Stamford, Connecticut in 1927. This juicy scandal was the subject of a “looking back” article in the Hartford Courant on Sunday, 23 February 2014, which offers new details. This is Part 2 of three segments.
• • Mae West's Imprint on Stamford, Connecticut • • 
• • “Homosexology" • •   
• • Frank Rizzo wrote:  But when Mrs. Hartley learned that the work "concerned itself and none too subtly with “homosexology" and cross-dressing, she "closed the door of her theater to the production."
• • But a hearing was sought by the producers of the play in Bridgeport and the show was allowed to go on — with detectives from New York, where the show would eventually head, in the audience. But the detectives didn't see the show as written because of expurgations demanded by the local police chief.
• • Frank Rizzo wrote:  But adding to the tabloid nature of the event was some off-stage drama, which the Courant reported with a combination of propriety and pulp fiction.
• • "Members of the company had a merry party [at a hotel] after the first performance." Among the participants were Miss Beverly West, sister of the author —- and a married woman —- and Edwin [sic] Elsner, who directed the play.
• • Beverly West cavorting with Edward Elsner • •  . . .
• • To be concluded on Monday.
• • Source: Article by Frank Rizzo, The Hartford Courant, published Sunday, 23 February 2014.
• • On Monday, 19 January 1981 in The N.Y. Times • •
• • Readers of The N.Y. Times opened their newspaper on Monday, 19 January 1981 and they read this startling headline: "Mae West Left Million, Mostly to Her Sister." A reporter based in California filed the story for Reuters, which was date-lined from Los Angeles.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • “Too much of a good thing can be wonderful,” Mae West famously remarked. And that's certainly true of wining and dining in Palm Beach.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: “I made my way in a man's world.”
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A biography of Mae West mentioned January 19.
• • It was Saturday, 19 January 1889, in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, NY, Battling Jack West and Tillie Delker took their wedding vows before a local minister with Jack's sister Julia West acting as maid of honor.
• • California biographer Emily Wortis Leider wrote: If they knew about it, Matilda's family almost certainly would have attempted to thwart her impetuous marriage at age eighteen to John "Battlin' Jack" West, a cigar-chomping, street-smart tough. The marriage certificate of Tillie Delker and John West, dated January 19, 1889, in the city of Brooklyn — — a separate city then, not yet a part of metropolitan New York — — lists the groom's age as twenty-two, his birthplace as New York City, and his occupation: "mechanic."
• • Source: excerpt from “Becoming Mae West” by Emily Wortis Leider; published by Farrar Straus and Giroux in 1997
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 13th anniversary • •  
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past thirteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,800 blog posts. Wow!  
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started thirteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3879th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

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• • Photo:
• • Mae West and sister wearing fur coats • • in 1935

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Mae West: Uplifting Nature

MAE WEST left her imprint on Stamford, Connecticut in late January and early February 1927. This scandal was the subject of a “looking back” article in the Hartford Courant on Sunday, 23 February 2014, which offers new details. This is Part 1 of three segments.
• • Mae West's Imprint on Stamford, Connecticut • •   
• • Frank Rizzo wrote:  Mae West wrote a play that caused controversy in Stamford, where it was scheduled for try-outs in 1927.
• • Frank Rizzo wrote: "The Drag" was a new play by Jane Mast slated to have its out-of-town try-out on a stage in Stanford in 1927. But trouble started when word spread that the author was really Mae West who had just scandalized Broadway with her play "Sex," which was still running with her as the star.
• • Frank Rizzo wrote:  The manager of the Stamford Theater, Mrs. Emily W. Hartley, which The Courant described as "an actress of note who is believed to have the distinction of being the only woman manager of a legitimate theater in the United States... [Mrs. Hartley] was given to understand that the play was of an uplifting nature."  But when Mrs. Hartley learned that the work concerned itself and none too subtly with “homosexology" and cross-dressing, then it seems she "closed the door of her theater to the production."
• • “Homosexology" • •  . . . 
• • To be continued.
• • Source: Article by Frank Rizzo, The Hartford Courant, published Sunday, 23 February 2014.
On Thursday, 18 January 1934 • •
• • On the third day of the robbery and jewel heist trial in Los Angeles, on 18 January 1934, Mae West was called to the witness stand to speak about Edward Friedman.
• • Worried after receiving death threats, and flanked by a human shield of husky detectives, Mae West entered the courtroom strikingly garbed in purple in Los Angeles. Career criminal Edward Friedman was charged with robbing the movie queen of $12,000 worth of diamonds and $3,400 in cash.
• • Overheard in Hollywood • •
• • Catholic groups were reacting to "The Chase and Sanborn Hour" and the Garden of Eden skit.
• • In Her Own Words • •
• • Mae West said: "As long as I was single, I belonged to every man. At least, he could think there was a possibility."
• • Quote, Unquote • •
• • A California daily mentioned Mae West.
• • "Mae West in Comedy at Madera Tomorrow" • •
• • Mae West among the cows and chickens! Romance in a barnyard and love among the hayricks! That's “Go West Young Man,” Miss West's latest starring vehicle with Warren William, Randolph Scott, Lyle Talbot and many others, which plays tomorrow night at the Madera Theatre.
• • With Miss West cast as a high strung and romantic movie actress enjoined by her contract from indulging in romance, and with Warren William as the press agent who accompanies her to make sure she doesn't violate the contract, “Go West Young Man” deals with the curvaceous actress’s attempts to find love and William’s efforts to frustrate her.
• • This is “crabbed” by William • •
• • After a personal appearance in Washington, D.C., Miss West meets dashing Lyle Talbot, an old flame, and makes a date with him. This is “crabbed" by William who invites the press to the private tete-a-tete.  . . .
• • Source: Review in Madera Daily Tribune (California); published on Monday, 18 January 1937
• • The Mae West Blog celebrates its 13th anniversary • •  
• • Thank you for reading, sending questions, and posting comments during these past thirteen years. Not long ago, we entertained 3,497 visitors. And we reached a milestone recently when we completed 3,800 blog posts. Wow!  
• • By the Numbers • •
• • The Mae West Blog was started thirteen years ago in July 2004. You are reading the 3878th blog post. Unlike many blogs, which draw upon reprinted content from a newspaper or a magazine and/ or summaries, links, or photos, the mainstay of this blog is its fresh material focused on the life and career of Mae West, herself an American original.

• • Come up and see Mae every day online: http://MaeWest.blogspot.com/
________

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• • Photo:
• • Mae West • in 1936

• • Feed — — http://feeds2.feedburner.com/MaeWest
  Mae West